Neurosurgeon Reflects on the Awe and Mystery of the Brain

Story at-a-glance −

British neurosurgeon Henry Marsh describes the fear and uncertainty that comes with brain surgery along with the sense of excitement and wonder Continue reading

Genetics Have Little Influence over Health, top Stem Cell Biologist Asserts

Bruce Lipton believes 98 percent of all illness is environmental, while a mere two percent of disease can be traced to genetic disposition. Working as a stem cell researcher at Stanford University, Lipton uncovered a startling truth: Our genetic composition has very little influence on health whereas the impact of chemistry within the body is far-reaching. Continue reading

Pull Up Self-Sabotage by the Roots

What is self-sabotage?

Self-sabotage is a term we throw around a lot . We know what it is in a general sense or when we see someone doing it. But what is it really?

When we talk about self-sabotage, we are talking about getting in our own way. It’s not something someone else is doing. We are doing things ourselves that cause the problems that bother us so much. It might be as simple as eating more than one cookie when we are on a diet to choosing the absolutely wrong partner over and over. Continue reading

Getting Well on the Way to the Doctor

Did You Know… … that a LOT of people get well on their way to the doctor?

We have two different minds: the conscious mind and the subconscious mind.  Some of us have learned how to control our conscious minds, but our subconscious minds are a bit more difficult to manage. Continue reading

Don’t Sleep On Negative Feelings and Emotions

Difficult decisions can be made easier if you “sleep on it.” In contrast, after unfortunate news, trauma, a big argument or any emotional upset, sleep makes your bad feelings worse. So reduce mental strain after unpleasantness by staying awake for a while even if it’s the middle of the night. Otherwise, giving in to sleep magnifies and promotes your unsettled feelings.

Reining In Emotions

I previously wrote an article about the role excessive emotions play in poor health, a relationship described in the theories of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). I have also noted how the body is merely energetic vibrations. By changing your vibration, you can change your health. Vibration is energy. When we do, feel or even think negative things our body energy shifts. To get the essence of this concept, just think about a time when you felt invigorated or content, and then compare that to how you feel when you’re anxious, panicked or depressed. Continue reading

Thoughts Can Produce Health Enhancing Biochemicals

Did You Know……that positive thoughts can produce health-enhancing biochemicals superior to any that a pharmaceutical company could ever manufacture–without any adverse side effects?

Contrary to what most people think, positive thoughts are not just whimsical mental images that make you feel good.  Recent research has shown that our thoughts can provide relief beyond the superficial and temporary.  When you consider that the average human being thinks of approximately 60,000 thoughts per day … the impact our thoughts have on both our mental and physical health becomes clear.

A Single Thought Has the Potential to Produce Over a Million Dollars’ Worth of a Cancer-Fighting Chemical!

Positive thinking has been proven to strengthen the immune system and lower stress levels, Continue reading

Improving Your Genetic Health

The genes you inherit from your parents strongly affect your health and longevity. But you can influence your genes in a healthy fashion using the proper herbs, nutrition and lifestyle choices. Research shows that the natural chemicals in particular foods and botanicals send signals to DNA, optimizing cellular function and keeping illness at bay. Even positive emotions can help DNA yield better health.

Redrawn Blueprints

We are all born with a certain genetic makeup, and scientists once believed that this blueprint was permanent and unchangeable — essentially that our DNA dictated our destiny. However, an exciting new field of genetic science is emerging which demonstrates that our gene expression can be influenced and altered for better or worse, based on internal and external triggers. These influences on our genes can change how we age, how our bodies react to lifestyle and environmental factors, how we resist illness and even how we gain weight.

Epigenetics is the study of how various factors affect our genes. Advances in this field are showing how environment, diet, lifestyle and even thoughts and emotions can have just as powerful an impact on gene function as biological lineage. Small changes in the expression of one master regulator gene, originating in a number of potential influences, Continue reading

Imagination Tricks the Brain into Eating Less

Simply imagining eating a certain food may help you eat less of it, new research indicates.

The finding challenges the assumption that thinking about a favorite food makes you crave it more and likely to eat more of it when it’s available.

In a series of experiments involving dozens of volunteers at Carnegie Mellon University, researchers found that people who repeatedly imagined eating a certain food, such as a cube of cheese or an M&M candy, subsequently ate less of it than they otherwise would have.

Simple Secrets to Portion Control and Healthy Eating

Suppressing Thoughts about a Desired Food Not a Good Strategy

“These findings suggest that trying to suppress one’s thoughts of desired foods in order to curb cravings for those foods is a fundamentally flawed strategy,” says Carey Morewedge, PhD, of Carnegie Mellon and author of the study.

“We think these findings will help develop future interventions to reduce cravings for things such as unhealthy food, drugs, and cigarettes; and hope they will help us learn how to help people make healthier food choices,” Morewedge says in a news release.

In one of Morewedge’s experiments, a group that imagined putting three quarters into a laundry machine and then imagined eating 30 M&Ms one at a time ate significantly fewer of the candies when given a bowl of M&Ms afterward, compared to a group that imagined putting 33 coins into a laundry machine and a third group that imagined inserting 30 quarters into a laundry machine and then imagined eating three M&Ms.

In other experiments, people were asked to imagine themselves eating cheese or another food, or doing something else completely different, like repeatedly putting coins into a laundry machine.

In each case where the group repetitively imagined eating a food, the researchers detected a gradual reduction in motivation to obtain food and a decrease in its subsequent intake, a process they called habituation. The research points to the conclusion that repetitive mental imagery has a different effect than picturing a single mental image, according to the study.