Milk Thistle May Prevent Photo-Aging and Skin Cancer

For more than 2,000 years, a spiky purple plant known as the “liver herb,” has been used in traditional medicine for healing a wide range of conditions from mushroom poisoning to indigestion.  Modern researchers have now added the prevention of photo-aging and skin cancer to the long list of milk thistle’s benefits. Continue reading

Med Schools Accepting Alternative Therapies

After noticing the growing number of Americans turning to alternative medicine, medical schools across the country are finally beginning to offer courses in the field. According to U.S. News University Connection, schools are now teaching acupuncture, massage therapy and herbal medicine principles to future doctors.

The news provider reports that medical universities such as the South Bay School of Nursing in California are offering classes in acupressure and other alternative therapies, in the hope that this will help their students find jobs in a greater number of institutions that embrace these practices.

Students who feel passionate about this subject may consider attending the Texas College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, which offers a dual master’s degree from the U.S. and China, Continue reading

The Natural Biological Regulator Mumio (mumijo)

Since olden times MUMIO has been known to enhance regenerative processes in different organs and tissues and was used as an anti-inflammatory and antitoxic agent, as well as for general health improvement.

The word MUMIO (sometimes spelled “MUMIO”) comes from the Greek word “mumia”, meaning a preserved body. It is a natural substance found mainly in high virgin mountains (2,000 – 5,000 meters) of Asian parts of Russia and neighboring areas (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan) as a resinous deposit in rock crevices.

MUMIO is a versatile, naturally occurring biological regulator, possessing a wide spectrum  Continue reading

The Differences between Traditional and Alternative Medicine

There is a big difference between traditional and alternative medicine, but the goals are the same. Both styles of medical care are aimed at treating and preventing illness using very different practices and methods. These days more and more people are advocating for a combination of both practices to achieve a more balanced level of health care, though. Following is an explanation of the differences between traditional and alternative medicine.

Traditional medicine is what doctors and other health practitioners at clinics, hospitals and primary care facilities practice in the United States and other Western countries. This style of medicine includes annual doctor’s visits and treatment of ailments using drugs, medical procedures and surgical operations. There is more of a focus on treatment rather than prevention, although this is starting to change.

Alternative medicine uses a more natural, holistic approach to healing. There are many Chinese medicine techniques used in alternative medicine, and most of the approaches are focused more on maintaining health and preventing health problems rather than treating ailments. Methods such as acupuncture, massage and chiropractic do focus on treating various conditions that cause pain, though, so there are alternative medicine methods that are used for treatment as well as for prevention.

The biggest differences between traditional and alternative medicine have to do with the approach to treating a problem. While a patient with a cough would go to a traditional doctor and be advised to take a cough suppressant, for example, an alternative medicine practitioner might look into the underlying causes of the cough and help prevent it from coming back again. Treatments such as acupuncture, acupressure, chiropractic care, diet, exercise, herbal remedies, massage, meditation and yoga are popular in alternative medicine. Traditional medicine practitioners focus on drugs as well as diet, exercise, surgical procedures and prevention by quitting smoking and ending other bad health habits.

More and more people are choosing to combine alternative and traditional medicine to maintain their health and treat their ailments. With more people demanding alternative medicine in the Western healthcare market, it is sure to become more accepted and readily available in the United States.

Three Years Ago WHO Head Backs Role of Traditional Medicine in Primary Health Care

BEIJING, Nov. 7, 2007 (Xinhua) — The role of traditional medicine in primary health care should be highlighted, Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), said here on Friday.

Thirty years ago, the WHO Alma-Ata Declaration recognized the role of traditional medicine practitioners within the primary health care system at the community level, Chan said at the opening ceremony of the WHO Congress on Traditional Medicine. “As a result, the significance and use of traditional medicine has increased in the past three decades.”

For millions of people living in rural areas of developing countries, herbal medicines, traditional treatments and traditional practitioners were the main and sometimes the only source of health care, she said.

“This is care that is close to homes, accessible and affordable. In some systems of traditional medicine, such as traditional Chinese medicine, traditional practices are supported by wisdom and experience acquired over centuries,” she said.

Traditional medicine has been proven as cheap, effective and acceptable in many developing countries’ primary health care systems, Chan said.

She noted, however, that an undesirable trend had also occurred in affluent societies, in the popularity of treatments and remedies that complement orthodox medicine or sometimes serve as an alternative to conventional treatments.

In North America and Europe, traditional medicine has become a multi-billion-dollar industry that was expected to continue growing rapidly, Chan said.

“This is not the poor man’s alternative to conventional care; this trend has some dangers.”

Chan called for all WHO members to bring traditional and Western medicine together in highly effective ways in the primary health care system. She said the two systems need not clash.

The three-day congress, hosted by the Chinese Ministry of Health and the State Administration of Traditional Medicine, has drawn more than 1,100 participants from 80 countries and regions.

A legacy of the congress will be the “Beijing Declaration”, which is scheduled to be published on Nov. 8 after it is agreed on by participating WHO members

WHO head backs role of traditional medicine in primary health care – Two Years Ago – So what happened?

WHO head backs role of traditional medicine in primary health care – Two Years Ago – So what happened?

BEIJING, Nov. 7, 2007 (Xinhua) — The role of traditional medicine in primary health care should be highlighted, Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), said hereon Friday.

    Thirty years ago, the WHO Alma-Ata Declaration recognized the role of traditional medicine practitioners within the primary health care system at the community level, Chan said at the opening ceremony of the WHO Congress on Traditional Medicine. “As a result, the significance and use of traditional medicine has increased in the past three decades.”

    For millions of people living in rural areas of developing countries, herbal medicines, traditional treatments and traditional practitioners were the main and sometimes the only source of health care, she said.

    “This is care that is close to homes, accessible and affordable. In some systems of traditional medicine, such as traditional Chinese medicine, traditional practices are supported by wisdom and experience acquired over centuries,” she said.

    Traditional medicine has been proven as cheap, effective and acceptable in many developing countries’ primary health care systems, Chan said.

    She noted, however, that an undesirable trend had also occurred in affluent societies, in the popularity of treatments and remedies that complement orthodox medicine or sometimes serve as an alternative to conventional treatments.

    In North America and Europe, traditional medicine has become a multi-billion-dollar industry that was expected to continue growing rapidly, Chan said.

    “This is not the poor man’s alternative to conventional care; this trend has some dangers.”

    Chan called for all WHO members to bring traditional and Western medicine together in highly effective ways in the primary health care system. She said the two systems need not clash.

    The three-day congress, hosted by the Chinese Ministry of Health and the State Administration of Traditional Medicine, has drawn more than 1,100 participants from 80 countries and regions.

    A legacy of the congress will be the “Beijing Declaration”, which is scheduled to be published on Nov. 8 after it is agreed on by participating WHO members

Pig bristles latest cure for eye problems

Pig bristles latest cure for eye problems

A Chinese hospital has come up with a novel way to cure near-sightedness in children – by sticking bristles from a pig in their eyes.

The affiliated hospital of Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine says the treatment has the same theory behind it as acupuncture.

Doctors use pig bristles to enter children’s tear ducts and stimulate the so called “Jingming point”, commonly used to treat eye problems in traditional Chinese medicine.

“We don’t use the usual needles, but pig bristles, which are the right size and more flexible,” said Zhu Ningyun, director of the hospital’s eye department.

Zhu says the treatment is proving effective at preventing and curing “lazy eye” in children and a number of other ailments.

He added: “We want to promote this treatment, to prevent near-sightedness and other problem areas before it’s too late.”

The hospital has contacted nearby primary schools and provided treatment to some nine-year-old children recently.

According to a survey jointly conducted by the ministries of Health and Education, in 2004 28 per cent of elementary-school students, 60 per cent of junior middle-school students and 85 per cent of senior middle-school students in China were near-sighted, giving China the largest population of near-sighted people in the world, reported People’s Daily.