Training Character Strengths Makes you Happy

Anyone who trains character strengths increases their sense of well being, a large-scale study conducted by a team of psychologists from the University of Zurich has concluded. It proved for the first time that this kind of training works. The largest impact was evident in training the strengths “curiosity”, “gratitude”, “optimism”, “humor” and “enthusiasm”. Continue reading

Training in Muscle Power Improves the Functional Capacity and Quality of Life of Elderly People

Twelve weeks of training geared towards improving muscular power in older people are highly effective for improving their functional capacity and quality of life, as shown by the studies carried out by the “Biomechanics and Physiology of Movement” research group at the Public University of Navarre led by Professor Mikel Izquierdo-Redin. Continue reading

Neck Strength Training: How It Can Help

The cervical spine, located in the neck, is subject to many of the same problems that plague the lower back — muscle strains and spasms, disk degeneration and denervation, and spinal stenosis. About 10 to 15 percent of people experience neck pain at any given time. Most neck pain is short lived and gets better on its own or with simple self-care measures. But sometimes neck pain is a red flag for a more serious problem.

Now a study reported in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes (Volume 8, page 48) suggests that strength training may help to improve the quality of life in women suffering with persistent neck pain.

Researchers randomly assigned 180 women with chronic neck pain to take part in either a strength-training program three times a week for one year, an endurance-training program Continue reading

Early Motor Experiences Give Infants a Social Jump Start

Study indicates infants at risk for autism could benefit from motor training

In a new study published today in the journal Developmental Science (Epub ahead of print), researchers from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Vanderbilt University found that early motor experiences can shape infants’ preferences for objects and faces. The study findings demonstrate that providing infants with “sticky mittens” to manipulate toys increases their subsequent interest in faces, suggesting advanced social development.

This study supports a growing body of evidence that early motor development and Continue reading