The History of Blood Flow Restriction Training

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Blood flow restriction (BFR) training was developed in Japan by Dr. Yoshiaki Sato in 1966. There, it’s known as KAATSU, which translates into “additional pressure”
  • KAATSU, known more generically as Blood Flow Modification, was introduced outside of Japan by Steven Munatones after a 13-year-long mentorship by Sato
  • Aside from dramatically improving muscle tone, BFR is also a wonderful tool for post-surgical rehabilitation, allowing you to regain physical function in a fraction of the time that you would normally anticipate
  • KAATSU is very safe, even for those with cardiovascular issues, and can also benefit those who are bedridden or paraplegic
  • The original KAATSU device became commercially available in 2006 and was quite large, heavy and bulky, with a $16,600 price tag. Since then, the technology has improved, gotten much smaller and is far less expensive

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Blood Flow Restriction Trainer Educator Interview

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Blood flow restriction (BFR) training involves partially restricting arterial inflow and fully restricting venous outflow in the limb during rest or exercise. Doing this allows you to significantly enhance strength and muscle mass using as little as 20% of your single-rep max weight
  • BFR training may be an ideal muscle-strengthening strategy for most people, but especially as an alternative for the elderly or injured, as it requires just a fraction of the weight you’d typically use in conventional resistance training
  • BFR has the ability to prevent and treat sarcopenia like no other type of training. BFR training also improves your aerobic capacity and cardiovascular endurance. One of the simplest ways of doing this is to walk with the cuffs high on your thigh for 15 to 20 minutes
  • BFR also improves osteoblast formation, or the formation of bone, and helps prevent further degradation of bone density, thus lowering your risk of osteoporosis

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