Top 10 Destructive Nutrition Lies Ever Told

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This article reviews my top 10 list of the most widespread, destructive lies typically told by mainstream nutritionists, despite being refuted by science

Millions of people have suffered needless pain and suffering, and premature death, by following commonly recommended low-fat, Continue reading

Magnesium Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

An astounding 70% or more of Americans are deficient in the essential mineral magnesium.  Low levels can have deadly effects.  Continue reading

The Unhealthiest of “Health Foods”

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Many of the foods commonly considered to be “health foods” are not good for your health

Eleven of the most common unhealthy “health foods” are discussed—including fruit juices, whole grains, agave nectar, vegetable oil and sports drinks Continue reading

Poor Diet Linked to Poor Sperm Count

Correlations between lifestyle and male fertility have been made in numerous studies over recent years. Some show that well fed sperm cells are most likely to achieve successful fertilization, while others confirm what most of us already suspected: that bad diet and lifestyle choices are an important cause of male infertility. Continue reading

Diet’s Role in Lowering Risk of Repeat Heart Attacks

Patients with heart disease frequently assume that medication is enough to forestall a repeat heart attack or stroke, but a large new study shows the preventive power of a healthy diet. Continue reading

An Ancient Eating Secret for Great Health

Health secrets reign in the land of Traditional Chinese Medicine, an amazing path to healing. At its root is the concept of Tao. What does this mean to you, and how can you keep a diet like a Taoist? Read on!

Aside from its likeness to our notion of karma, Taoism is like being at one with nature. Its essence, Continue reading

Boost Your Immune System with Zinc

Did you know that more than 300 unique enzymes need zinc to work effectively? Zinc is found in each cell of your body. It is involved directly in nearly every single bodily process that you can think of.

But that’s not all that makes zinc an amazing mineral. Zinc also has the power to boost your immune system in a special way. Continue reading

More Evidence Showing the Benefits of Fiber

When thinking about the preventable health epidemics of our generation, obesity and diabetes surely top the list. For most people, both obesity and type 2 diabetes can be managed and even eliminated by following a healthier lifestyle. And if this sounds complicated, it’s not. Adopting healthier eating habits and getting some exercise are not hard to do. The best approach is Continue reading

How Diabetes Could Rob You of Your Hearing

One of the big problems with diabetes is that it can trigger complications that affect certain areas of the body. A new study has delivered health news having to do with hearing: diabetes, if not controlled well, boosts your risk of hearing loss. Continue reading

Natural Food Remedies Fight Cold and Flu

During the holiday season, the cold and lack of sufficient sunlight are enough to weaken the body’s natural defenses against cold and flu. Luckily, experts say that consuming specific types of foods might increase our resistance to colds and seasonal pathogens. These cold fighting foods are rich in minerals, vitamins and phytochemicals that help repel invading microorganisms, strengthen our immune response, and reduce inflammation and cold associated symptoms.

Consuming raw, vegan foods (such as sesame and mustard seeds, celery, beans, almonds, cashews, whole grains, pumpkin and sunflower seeds and cocoa powder) may work wonders on human immunity due to their high zinc content. Continue reading

Super Spaghetti: The Pasta with Health Benefits

Into the annals of food cures steps a new innovation in the pasta department. Researchers have created pasta made with barley, which could significantly improve the health benefits of this Italian cuisine staple.

File this one under health breakthroughs for whole grains, a group that includes barley. The health news, reported in the “Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” highlights how barley is gaining interest as an ingredient in functional foods. These are the supermarket items that actually exert functions in the human body due to the nutrients and natural chemicals they contain.

Thus, we might soon see packages of pasta labeled “good source of dietary fiber” and “may reduce the risk of heart disease” thanks to the development of this barley pasta. Famous for giving beer its characteristic strength and flavor, barley could transform the spaghetti aisle.

Barley is an excellent source of fiber and antioxidants, which are natural chemicals believed to prevent the kind of cellular damage that can lead to chronic disease (starting with cancer) naturally.

The functional foods idea Continue reading

3 Excellent Fasts from Traditional Chinese Medicine

These fasts can do wonders for your natural health.

1. The Cooked Grain Fast
Whole grains are a huge part of the Asian diet. Anyone with cold or deficient symptoms will benefit from a whole grain fast, as will those who want to sharpen their concentration and memory. It must last at least three days, and you must chew food very thoroughly. Whole grain rice and other grains, such as millet, barley, and whole wheat, are common staples. If you’re out to detox, millet is your best bet. Drink some warming herbal teas if you have “cold” symptoms (here “cold” refers to a specific aspect of symptoms in Chinese medicine, not the common cold). Continue reading

Healthy Diet Improves Cognitive Impairment

Individuals who eat plenty of fresh produce, whole grains and lean meat often experience significant physical health benefits when compared to people who favor diets high in fat and carbohydrates.

Now, researchers at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System have suggested that a diet that is good for the heart and waistline may also have positive benefits for the mind.

In a four-week trial, the scientists found that a diet that was low in saturated fats and simple carbohydrates resulted in reduced levels of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease as well as lowered cholesterol. Additionally, a healthy diet was shown to improve memory test scores for both normal participants and those experiencing mild cognitive impairment.

“The therapeutic effects of  Continue reading

Foods that Promote Happiness

If you’re feeling as blue as the skies above, you will be happy to know that a few spoonfuls of the right foods may turn that frown upside down! Whole foods contain vital nutrients that provide both physical and psychological benefits. Read on to discover which foods contain those mood-boosters to help you smile your way to longevity.

Fun with Folate

Eat folate-rich foods: Leafy greens like kale, broccoli, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, bok choy, legumes, sunflower seeds, oranges, melons, beets, and fortified whole grains

Why? Folate, also known as folic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that is necessary for cell division, DNA synthesis, and healthy blood cell production. Research at the University of York and Hull York Medical School has found a link between depression and low levels of folate. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for men and women is 400 micrograms and 600 micrograms for pregnant women. To keep you smiling, increase your intake of folate-rich foods. A cup of cooked lentils provides 90% of the RDA of folic acid. Plus, the fiber and protein will satisfy you longer, stabilize blood sugar, and also promote a better mood. Additional bonuses: Folate can also decrease homocysteine, an amino acid that is linked to heart disease. Low levels of folate can cause anemia, while pregnant women must increase their folate levels to prevent fetal neural tube deficiencies.

Boost Your B6

Eat B6 foods: bananas, chicken breast, garlic, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, sunflower seeds, broccoli, red bell peppers, watermelon, avocados, and potatoes

Why? Vitamin B6 plays a role in red blood cell metabolism, protein metabolism, and synthesis of neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine. It also helps maintain healthy blood sugar levels, and increases the amount of oxygen carried to your tissues. Low levels can lead to an increase of homocysteine, anemia, headaches, and depression. The RDA for adults from age 19 to 50 is 1.3 mg/day and approximately 1.6 mg for individuals over 50. The next time you’re feeling down, grab a banana and munch your blues away!

Go Fish!

Eat omega-3-rich foods: fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel, anchovies, and herring, flaxseeds, walnuts, and algae

Why? DHA omega-3 essential fatty acid maintains healthy brain function and is vital for fetal brain and eye development. Current research also demonstrates the association between intake of omega-3 fatty acids and depression. A meta-analysis study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found that depression was significantly improved in patients with unipolar and bipolar disorders after taking three daily fish capsules for eight weeks. Eat the oily fish listed above — a 3-ounce serving of salmon contains between 1.1 – 1.9 grams of omega-3 fatty acids. Supplementing with high quality fish oil capsules may be an alternative if you don’t consume fish on a regular basis. Vegetarian sources of omega-3 can be found in flaxseeds, walnuts, and algae. Toss a tablespoon of sunflower seeds or walnuts into a creamy cup of unsweetened low-fat yogurt for a mega mood boost!

You can also try Super Clarity, a blend of powerful herbs that nourish the brain and cardiovascular system, helping the mind be joyful.

Good Carbohydrates, Bad Carbohydrates

Eat good carbohydrates: whole grains, fruits, vegetables

Why? Not all carbohydrates are created equal. Whole grains, fruits, and veggies supply us with prolonged energy, fiber, and multiple nutrients that our bodies need for optimal health. Good quality carbohydrates can also trigger serotonin synthesis. Recognized as the “happy hormone,” serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that affects our mood and sleep. The next time you feel blue, instead of reaching for that bag of chips or sugary cookies, opt for unrefined, unprocessed carbohydrates that will provide you with sustained energy and an improved mood. Toss that muffin and enjoy a whole grain cracker with a tablespoon of natural nut butter for a delicious and uplifting snack!

Lower Blood Pressure with Whole Grains

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Eating lots of whole grains could ward off high blood pressure, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In the study, men with the highest whole-grain consumption were 19 percent less likely to develop high blood pressure than men who ate the least amount of whole grains.

While refining grains removes their outer coating, whole grains retain their bran and germ, so they are richer in many nutrients, Dr. Alan J. Flint of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and his colleagues note in their report.

The most recent US guidelines recommend that people get at least 3 ounces, or 85 grams, of whole grains daily, and that they consume at least half of their grains as whole grains.

There’s evidence, the investigators note, that women who eat more whole grains are less likely to develop high blood pressure, also called hypertension, but there is less information on how whole grains might affect men’s heart health.

To investigate, Flint and his team looked at data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, which has followed 51,529 men since 1986, when the study participants were 40 to 75 years old. They looked at a subset of 31,684 men free of hypertension, cancer, stroke or heart disease at the study’s outset. During 18 years of follow-up, 9,227 of them developed hypertension.

The men in the top fifth of whole grain consumption, who averaged about 52 grams daily, were 19 percent less likely than the men in the bottom fifth, who ate an average of about 3 grams of whole grains daily, to develop hypertension during follow-up.

When the researchers looked at separate components of whole grains, only bran showed an independent relationship with hypertension risk, with men who consumed the most at 15 percent lower risk of hypertension than men who ate the least. However, the researchers note, the amount of bran in the men’s diet was relatively small compared to their total intake of whole grain and cereal fiber.

The relationship between whole grain intake and hypertension risk remained even after accounting for men’s fruit and vegetable intake, use of vitamins, amount of physical activity, and whether or not they were screened for high cholesterol.

This suggests that the association was independent of these markers of a healthy lifestyle behavior pattern. It’s possible, the researchers say, that the men who ate more whole grains gained less weight over time.

The current findings, Flint and colleagues conclude, “Have implications for future dietary guidelines and for the prevention of hypertension.”

SOURCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, September 2009.